Rosaline's story

Rosaline comes from Sehwe Bekwan in the western region of Ghana. A love of books and spending time with her friends, Rosaline is just like many other 11-year-olds around the world and lives at home with her mother, Jalsa, a baker in the local village. 

When Rosaline’s right arm started to swell, Jalsa took her daughter to a local clinic in the hope of finding a cure but it was to no avail. It was not until Rosaline was referred to Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital (KATH), which is supported by World Child Cancer, that she was diagnosed with cancer. 

After having her arm amputated, Rosaline has now been discharged from hospital but is still required to return regularly to receive chemotherapy. With Jalsa spending extended periods of time with her daughter in hospital and away from her work, she has very little income to fund the travel and treatment costs. 

It takes us five hours to get to the hospital for Rosaline’s treatment. Even though we struggle with finding funds, I know how important it is for Rosaline’s health to finish her treatment.

Inspired by Gladys, a healthcare worker on the paediatric oncology ward, Rosaline wants to become a nurse when she grows up so she can help children like her in the future. 

Meg Collington, Health Partnership and Program Officer, met young Rosaline when visiting our programme at KATH in 2017; 

Rosaline is very brave and full of energy. Despite having had her arm amputated just a few weeks ago she was running around the hospital and keen to meet new people. She desperately wants to go back to school so she can see her friends and keep learning her favourite subject – maths! 

World Child Cancer’s projects in Ghana provide training for healthcare professionals to recognise early warning signs of cancer. An early diagnosis increases the chances of survival for children with cancer. With your support, we can provide children with cancer a faster route to better treatment.